Disney Scrapper Pins Comparison Photos

Disney Scrapper Pins Comparison Photos

We talked about the different types of Scrapper Disney pins, now I want to show you some comparison photos to further help you learn how to spot fake pins.

Did you know that there is no one surefire way to tell if a pin is a scrapper or not?  That pins on the racks in the Disney gift shops can have the same classic Scrapper signs, like Dipped paint, rough enamel, brush strokes, a reverse border (Mickey heads not going all the way off of the back of the pin smoothly), and a matte finish?

These photos were taken by me from pins in my collection.  You will see photos of the authentic pin, and the unauthorized, or scrapper pin.

These photos are to help you understand the different common qualities of a scrapper pin, and to help you determine pin quality to give you a better understanding, therefore enabling you to make a better decision when trying to judge if a pin is a scrapper or not.

This first picture shows an authentic Duffy hidden Mickey pin.

And this next picture shows the scrapper version.  scrapperinfo

Do you see the difference?  See how shiny the pin in the first photo is?  It’s glossy and has a nice shine.  It’s very smooth, with smooth edges.

One trick I like to remember, and as you look at the photos you will notice, is that fine silver lines on scrapper pins are thick.

Look at the thickness of the lines, like in Duffy’s Eyes, the thin fine lines in the real Duffy are different than in the fake Duffy.

It’s also not flat, the enamel is dipped, you can see it on Duffys beard.

The second photo (the scrapper picture), is noticeably dull, and you can actually see the matte finish … NO gloss!

The edges are not smooth, see the rough metal on the hat?  I circled it in red.


Looking at these two photos it’s VERY easy to spot the fake pin.

What if you didn’t have a pin to compare to?  What if you’ve never even seen the pin before?  Would you know that the second pin was a fake?
 

If you learn the signs then you’ll get better and better at judging.  My motto is check the pin for quality.  Once I get home from pin trading at the Walt Disney Parks and Resorts I always look through all my pins and check for quality.  If a pin is not very nice looking, or poor qualtiy, I may not want to keep it.

If a pin is dull, matte, dipped, rough, it’s very likely to be a scrapper.

This Donald Duck Nerd pin is real.

It’s glossy and a nice quality.

The next photo of Donald is of a fake pin.

The photo above shows brush strokes really well.  Some authentic pins have brush strokes, but it’s not that common.

One of the most noticeable things about a scrapper pin, besides the matte finish, and rough edges, are brush strokes.  See the light lines in the gray area?  You don’t see them on the real Donald pin do you?

Can you see the differences?  Comment below!

Don’t be fooled though, it’s not as cut and dry as that though.  There are different types of scrapper Disney pins.  Some are made very well, and can be very hard to tell apart from the real deal, especially if you’ve never seen the authentic pin in person.

In the photo above it would probably be hard to tell the scrapper from the real pin if you didn’t have the two to compare to each other.
Which one is the authentic pin?  The pin on the left!
This scrapper Disney pin photo shows the rough metal edges very well.  See the metal “lip” on the bottom of the pin on the right?  It’s rough, and looking at the pin from above you can actually see the metal sticking out.  An authentic pin almost NEVER has rough edges.
Of course the colors are off, but you might not know this if you didn’t have the real pin to look at.

I hope that this page on  Disney Scrapper Pins Comparison Photos helps you on your goal of learning about scrapper pins, and how to avoid them.

Remember, there is no 100% accurate way to tell if a pin is a fake or not.  Just use your own judgement, and try to judge the quality of the pin in question, and if you like a pin, or your child likes a pin, remember, it’s just a piece of metal, and there’s nothing wrong with keeping it, even it you’re not sure of it’s authenticity. ºOº

Return to Home Page
Return to Top of Page

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *